Michael Geyer with Naomi Nelson viewing materials in the Rubenstein Library.

Michael Geyer with Naomi Nelson viewing materials in the Rubenstein Library.

Michael Geyer is a Samuel N. Harper Professor of German and European History and the Faculty Director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Chicago. His research includes German and European History, the History of War and Genocide, Transnational and Global History and the History and Theory of Human Rights and Humanitarianism.

Dr. Geyer spoke at Duke in the Borderwork(s) Lab on Monday February 24, 2014 on the topic “Human Rights Education After Human Rights Idolatry.” The event was sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center@FHI and supported by RightsConnect, a Humanities Writ Large                                                                                            Emerging Networks Initiative.

Kelly Carroll (’16) conducted an interview over the phone with Michael Geyer about the value of human rights programs at universities that was featured in DukeToday. Here is an excerpt from the interview.

KC: Is it important for university level students to gain an education in human rights? How do you think this might prepare them differently than students without this education for life after college?

Michael Geyer: There are several answers to the question. The most important one is that human rights education prepares students for citizenship in an entangled world. This is to say that knowing your way around in this world is a prerequisite for really mastering and living in it. That’s the bottom line for human rights education. It’s also its attraction. READ MORE.

Full-length video of Michael Geyer’s talk.