FEATURED COURSES

 

CULANTH 245S: Human Rights in the Americas (DukeImmerse – Rights & Identities)

INSTRUCTOR: Robin Kirk

This course introduces students to the history of human rights in Latin America, with a focus on certain regions. We will begin with the Conquest and cover the emergence of independent nation-states; the role of imposed economic policies, including neoliberalism; indigenous protest movements and their relationships to corporate interests; and the influence of the United States on human rights, government formation, immigration and the drug trade. Instructor consent required. Open only to students in the DukeImmerse program; instructor consent required.

 

LINGUIST 389S: Linguistic Rights in the Americas (DukeImmerse – Rights & Identities)

INSTRUCTOR: Liliana Paredes, PhD

This DukeImmerse course brings together topics of language and human rights, focusing on situations of linguistic disparities in the Americas. Explores questions of language contact, bilingualism and endangered languages from perspectives of social injustices and human rights. Examines how language aids in the construct of social context and institutions and how it reflects and sustains social realities, reflecting on situations of oppression and how they are associated to sociolinguistic attitudes and behavior. Explores overlap of linguistic human rights with cultural and minority rights; all in connection to the right of maintaining one’s identity as well as sustaining human rights.

 

AMES 204FS: Documenting the Middle East

INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Kalow

Studies the documentary record of the Middle East in photography, film, and oral history. From early studio photography to recent community and student production, considers documentary expression’s meaning and function. Analyzes the role of digital humanities and social media in documentary research. Uses best practices of documentary work. Includes a hands-on documentary component: recording diverse voices from Iraqi, Syrian, and Palestinian communities. Student-produced fieldwork from the class will be permanently housed at Duke’s Archive of Documentary Arts. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Department consent required.

 

GLHLTH 302: Global Narratives of Living with HIV/AIDS

INSTRUCTOR: Kearsely Stewart

How do we learn about the global experience of people living with HIV/AIDS? Read biographies, narratives, poetry, and blogs written by HIV+ persons, their families, friends, doctors, and caregivers. Listen to stories told in film documentaries and on the internet. Study interdisciplinary theories of identity and sexuality, illness narratives, narrative medicine, and doctor-patient communication. Reflect on the different meanings of the AIDS experience for men and women, young and old, in Brazil, Botswana, China, Haiti, Russia, South Africa, and rural and urban USA. Apply this new framework to investigate and analyze HIV/AIDS programs. Prior global health coursework recommended.

 

POLSCI 331: Prisoner’s Dilemma and Distributive Justice

Economic, political, and philosophical perspectives on distribution justice and the problems in each discipline raised by variations on the prisoner’s dilemma. Classic texts include Hobbes and Hume, Smith and Mill, Rawls and Nozick. Gateway course to the Politics, Philosophy, and Economics certificate program. Suggested prerequisites: Economics 101 Economic Principles, and a course in ethics or political philosophy.